Tag Archives: 1968 Mercury Cougar

Vacuum System Diagnosis Guide: What’s with the Spaghetti?

In 1968, you only got a small portion, but it was still spaghetti

1968 Vacuum System Diagnosis GuideIf you’ve never spent a Saturday afternoon trying to figure out which vacuum line goes where on that ’68 Cougar you bought from the guy who thought his vacuum system modifications would improve things, you’re very lucky.

The fact is, even Lincoln/Mercury’s technicians needed occasional help when it came to untangling the spaghetti-like mass of vacuum lines under the hood of the ’68 model line. In that battle, they had a special weapon at their disposal that you can now add to your personal Cougar arsenal: the 1968 Lincoln/Mercury Vacuum System Diagnostic Guide. And to make things easy, we’ve also made a handy PDF version that you can download and save to print out as needed.

Hopefully, they’ll make the spaghetti a little less frustrating.

But Wait,There’s More: The Dealer Guide

Even then, they knew just how to play you. If the 1968 Mercury Cougar didn’t have you searching your couch cushions for pennies, the Dealer Guide would.

1968 Mercury Cougar Dealer GuideIt’s 1968. You’re standing in front of the Lincoln-Mercury dealership. The gas station on the corner is in the midst of a “gas war” with a station down the street; premium is going for 19.9 cents a gallon. Your palms are sweaty. You take a deep breath and walk through the door of the dealership, telling the salesman who meets you at the door that you’re interested in a new Mercury Cougar.

Two hours later, he’s told you all he knows about the model on the showroom floor. He’s had to pry your fingers off the wheel at the end of a long test drive, and he can tell by the gleam in your eyes that he’s got you just where he wants you. He sits you down at his desk, and with a flourish, he produces…the Dealer Guide. A showroom model will no longer suffice. You’re ready to forfeit your soul for a custom-configured Cougar if they’d only show you where to sign.

Click on the image above to view a flipping-page version of the Mercury Cougar section of the Dealer Guide, or download the Cougar section of the Dealer Guide in PDF format here. Be sure to check out the photos of the Mercury Cougar interior color section of the Dealer Guide in the Classic Cougar Community photo gallery.

Chris Farmer’s First Car: 1968 Cougar Standard

1968 Mercury Cougar Standard - Front ViewMy love affair with Cougars started back in 1991. I had always been into classic cars, and as I approached my 16th birthday I started searching for “my car.” I saw many cars I would love to have and looked at a few that were realistic. I looked at ’61 Impalas, Chevelle’s, etc. Finally, my dad pointed out an ad he had seen at work for a 1968 Mercury Cougar. After looking at the car we decided the deal was right and Dad bought the car for me and thus the addiction started.

Dan Gurney Special

Dan Gurney specials were produced for the 1967 and 1968 model years only. They were promoted by Dan Gurney who signed a sponsorship deal with Mercury for the 1967 Trans Am racing season. The DGS option included a chrome engine dress-up kit, “turbine wheel covers” and a sticker on the rear passenger (needs to be confirmed it was passenger side please) side window. The chrome engine dress up kit consisted of a chrome air cleaner lid, dipstick and valve covers. All of these items were available as dealer installed options for both model years and today the only real way to be sure of having a real DGS car is to get your Marti report from Marti Autoworks.

DGS Production Numbers

  • 1967 – 19,783
  • 1968 – 11,900

Please note: DGS cars are completely separate from XR7-Gs. The XR7 G is a different beast entirely. Where as the DGS was mainly a dress-up option the XR7-G cars are rare performance monsters. To this day there are still people who confuse the two designations.

1968 Cougar

The 1968 model year included: Standard Coupe, XR7, GT, Dan Gurney Special, GT-E, XR7-G

Nineteen sixty-eight saw the addition of 2 new model packages to the Cougar lineup. The GT-E and XR-7G. What a great year to buy a Cougar. The car maintained the same body lines from the 67 model with some slight changes. Most notable were the addition of side signal markers on the front and rear quarters, a 2 spoke steering wheel (as opposed to the 3 spoke offered in the 1967 model) and some slight badge changes to the rear quarter panel emblems.

With the huge popularity and success of the Cougar in it’s inaugural year, Ford decided to double up on the car’s winning steak by adding a slew of high performance engine packages and upgrades. Where as the 1967 cars had only the 289 or 390 engine options, the 1968 cars were offered with a 289(2bbl), 302(2bbl), 302(4bbl), 390(2bbl), 390(4bbl), 427(4bbl) and the almighty 428CJ(4bbl). The 427 engine option was available only as part of the GT-E package for the first part of the 1968 production run. The 427 option was dropped midyear and replaced with the new 428CJ block option for the last half of 1968.

(Please note this page is not complete and requires more info. Please email with any additions or corrections to these pages and ask about becoming one of the editors for the CCC information articles.)