Cougar withdrawal syndrome

This is the place to kick a few tires, drink a few beers, and tell a few tales.
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whitelightning777
Registered Member
Posts: 128
Joined: 05 Nov 2019, 13:49

Cougar withdrawal syndrome

#1

Post by whitelightning777 »

:mrgreen: Mostly for comic relief I dropped off my car to try to get it MD state inspected.

I've heard that getting a vehicle actually inspected instead of merely having historic tags adds to its value.

I also have several small annoyances that have to be fixed as part of the inspection anyway such as a possible vacuum leak affecting the defroster and a fuel sending unit that needs to be replaced etc.

The seats have an interesting glitch as well. Both are extremely stiff to move backwards and forwards. I'm not sure if that is an inspection item however.

It'll be interesting to see what the mechanic found out. The vehicle is supposed to have been electronically and mechanically restored, but I suspect that some minor errors could have been made.

I told them that I could probably spend $1200 total. I can go higher but I want to see the results.
Inspect Mercury 1968.jpg
Inspect Mercury 1968.jpg (52.53 KiB) Viewed 181 times
Hagerty told me the reason that the insurance rates were so low for my vehicle is because no one actually drives them on a regular basis!!

Little do they know me!!

It's been about 2 hours now and I have to wait until tomorrow morning for them to look at it -- an eternity!!

CATHOUSE
Registered Member
Posts: 1253
Joined: 20 Aug 2013, 08:24
Location: Elizabethtown PA

Re: Cougar withdrawal syndrome

#2

Post by CATHOUSE »

Your seats are probably an easy fix. Most likely the sliders just need a good cleaning and relube of the moving parts. You will need to remove the seats from the car to do the job properly.

Randy Goodling
CCOA #95

whitelightning777
Registered Member
Posts: 128
Joined: 05 Nov 2019, 13:49

Re: Cougar withdrawal syndrome

#3

Post by whitelightning777 »

I just got a call back from the mechanic.

He says that the gas tank is damaged in the rear and probably in turn damaged the float in the sending unit.

It looks like I have to pull the gas tank.

How common is this?

I don't recall hitting anything and the fuel sender worked fine when I got the cat and slowly began to fail.

It looks like I'm going to have to somehow figure out a way to get under the cougar in a very confined area.

whitelightning777
Registered Member
Posts: 128
Joined: 05 Nov 2019, 13:49

Re: Cougar withdrawal syndrome

#4

Post by whitelightning777 »

It's not leaking gasoline. Maybe the best thing is to just leave it alone or figure something out.

How could a dent in the back of the tank damage the sending unit mounted in the back a little bit at a time?

They say that the car is hard to figure out and they've never seen anything like it.

They also can't buy parts online, but can install them if I order them and have them mailed to their location.

I'm thinking that it's best to figure out some way to safely lift the vehicle. I REALLY don't want to drain the gasoline and do the tank but it's a straight forward job.

Taking the dash off and getting the seats out isn't that hard to understand either.

Getting it safely into the air is the biggest challenge. On my previous doomed vehicle, I could do it in the driveway or my parent's 2 car garage.

CATHOUSE
Registered Member
Posts: 1253
Joined: 20 Aug 2013, 08:24
Location: Elizabethtown PA

Re: Cougar withdrawal syndrome

#5

Post by CATHOUSE »

I do not see a dent in the back of the gas tank having any effect on the sending unit. If you do not recall hitting anything then most likely the dent was there when you purchased the car. I would say that your sending unit problem is either an electrical issue or a sending unit problem.

Randy Goodling
CCOA #95

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