Holley 4150 Rebuild (D0ZF-9510-AB / LIST 4514-1)

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Mike_B_SVT
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Holley 4150 Rebuild (D0ZF-9510-AB / LIST 4514-1)

#1

Post by Mike_B_SVT » 21 Feb 2013, 19:44

Holley 4150 Rebuild (D0ZF-9510-AB / List 4514-1) - by Mike_B.

I’m a novice. I’ve never rebuilt a carburetor before. This ambitious venture started when I discovered my carb was leaking fuel from a stripped fitting (at the time I didn’t even know what to call the place it was leaking from). After some research and reading I learned it was my secondary fuel bowl. I’ve since had it repaired, as the cost was comparable to a new replacement. With my car running poorly prior to this, it pointed at the carburetor as the culprit. Since it was already half disassembled it seemed practical to rebuild it. I wanted to learn the process and possibly save the cost of a professional rebuild / restoration, so I thought I would try my hand at rebuilding it myself. It is just a few screws and gaskets, how tough can it really be? Besides, I can always pay a pro to fix my mess, if need be.

First thing I did was figure out what rebuild kit I would need. Very few rebuild kits specifically list my Holley LIST 4514 number as a compatible carburetor. I ended up going with an NPD 4150 kit (PN: 9A586-12) because it only listed Ford 428/CJ/SCJ applications, and appeared to have the fewest “extra” parts that I would have to sort through. I didn’t want extra parts complicating things.

Next I went shopping for cleaners / solvents. Apparently the traditional method of cleaning is to disassemble all the parts and remove the old gaskets, and then soak the parts in solvent to soften any remaining gasket material, varnish and deposits. Spray with a carburetor cleaner while scrubbing to remove gaskets and gunk, rinse your parts, and then blow dry with compressed air. Easy!

My list of tools;
- Socket set
- Wrench set and / or Crescent wrench
- Screwdriver set
- Safety Goggles
- Rubber gloves (for working with fuel or solvents)
- Solvent (I used Berryman’s, in a 1gal can with a parts basket)
- Carburetor Cleaner spray (again, Berryman’s)
- Brush, stiff bristled plastic
- Shop Towels / cleaning cloths
- Large Pan (I used a large aluminum turkey pan from the dollar store)
- Cup or bowl (optional, for draining fuel bowls)
- Four 2” bolts and eight nuts (a makeshift carburetor work stand)

Carburetor Removal
Removing my carburetor was much easier than I anticipated. It is basically held in place by four nuts and has 4 cables or hoses attached to it.

SAFETY! Ensure the vehicle is not running when removing the carburetor. Wear safety goggles and proper chemical handling gloves when handling or working with fuel, solvents and cleaners. Ensure fuel, solvents and cleaners are kept away from open flames or heat sources. Always follow the directions on the labels of your solvents and cleaners, and check for chemical compatibility between cleaners and solvents you are using.

NOTE: Some people may prefer to drain the fuel from the carburetor before removing it from the intake manifold (see step 3). I found it was easier to drain after removal (see steps 9 and 10). Your results may vary.

1) At the front of the carburetor disconnect the fuel line from the fuel filter (see Figure 1). Use a cloth to catch and wipe up any spilled fuel.
----a. Depending on your fuel filter connection, this may require a screw driver (for screw clamps), or pliers (for spring clamps).
Image
FIGURE 1 - Front Driver's Side

2) Cap off the fuel line to prevent spilling fuel.

3) Drain the Fuel Bowls (OPTIONAL at this point);
----a. Place a cup or bowl below one of the Primary Fuel Bowl screws to catch the fuel as it drains. You may also want to put down a towel to catch any spilled fuel.
----b. Loosen one of the bottom fuel bowl screws until the fuel drains out into the cup/bowl (see Figure 2)
----c. Repeat for the Secondary Fuel Bowl on the other end of the carburetor.
----d. Remove the Fuel Line connector between the Primary and Secondary Fuel Bowls (located on the passenger side of the carburetor - see Figure 3, below) and drain the fuel from it into the cup/bowl.
Image
FIGURE 2 - Driver's Side

4) Remove the manual choke connection on the passenger side of the carburetor (see Figure 3).
NOTE: This may vary if your carburetor is not equipped with a manual choke.
----a. Loosen the screw holding the choke actuator wire and remove the wire from the mount.
----b. Loosen the screw clamping the black choke actuator and disconnect the choke actuator from the carburetor.
Image
FIGURE 3 - Passenger Side

5) Disconnect the vacuum line from the passenger side of the carburetor (see Figure 4).
Image
FIGURE 4 - Front Passenger Side

6) Disconnect the throttle return spring located on the driver’s side of the carburetor (see Figure 5).
Image
FIGURE 5 - Driver's Side

7) Disconnect the throttle actuator from the throttle linkage on the driver’s side of the carburetor (see Figure 5). The actuator snaps on/off of the linkage.

8) Remove the nuts at the four corners of the carburetor using a socket or wrench (see Figures 1 through 5, for reference).

9) Gently lift the carburetor off of the mounting studs. Be careful not to tip or tilt the carburetor if you have not drained the fuel bowls yet as this may cause fuel to spill or drip from the carb. You may have to work the carburetor loose from the intake manifold, but do not pry on the carburetor or you may damage it.

10) Drain the Fuel Bowls (skip this step if you drained the fuel bowls already)
----a. Place the carburetor in a large pan to catch the fuel as it drains from the Fuel Bowls. You may also need a towel to catch any spilled fuel.
----b. Loosen one of the bottom screws on the Primary Fuel Bowl until the fuel drains out into the pan (see Figure 2).
----c. Repeat for the Secondary Fuel Bowl on the other end of the carburetor.
----d. Remove the Fuel Line connector between the Primary and Secondary Fuel Bowls, located on the passenger side of the carburetor and drain the fuel from it into the pan (see Figure 3).
----e. Tip the carb as necessary to ensure all fuel has been drained. You may also need to manually actuate the Accelerator Pump lever (located on the bottom of the Primary Fuel Bowl - see Figure 1) to release stored fuel.
----f. Drain the fuel from the pan into a proper storage or disposal container.

11) If desired, install the four sets of nuts and bolts into the mounting holes on the carburetor. These will act as “feet” or stands so you may actuate the carburetor butterfly valves without damaging them.

12) Place a clean shop towel or intake cover plate over the carburetor opening on the intake manifold to prevent debris from falling into the intake.

This ends the Carburetor Removal portion of the procedure.

I’m still in the middle of my carb rebuild - last weekend I disassembled and cleaned it, so I’ll try to get that written up next. I intend to post the remaining portions of the procedure as I progress, and with a little luck I'll be firing the car back up next weekend!
Last edited by Mike_B_SVT on 22 Feb 2013, 15:48, edited 1 time in total.
Mike B.
CCOA # 9553

1970 Cougar Eliminator (Competition Gold / Black Decor Interior)
1 of 70 with 428SCJ, Ram Air, 4-speed.
Cat Bites Man!

Looking for an Eliminator? Then be sure to check out the "Eliminators on the Market" thread in the Classic Cougars For Sale section of the forum!

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tmh
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Re: Holley 4150 Rebuild (D0ZF-9510-AB / LIST 4514-1)

#2

Post by tmh » 21 Feb 2013, 20:57

Great detail. I'm in the middle of my carb rebuild right now also. The only piece of advice I have so far is that after spraying individual pieces of the carb with carb cleaner, don't set them down for even a minute or two on a painted surface (in my case the handrail of my back porch stairs, where I had brought the parts on the way back in to the house). Apparently carb cleaner is really, really good at turning old paint into sticky goo. Had to go back outside and spray the parts again. :)
'68 XR-7 J-Code C4, San Jose, Edelbrock 1406, PS, Front PDB, 8" rear 3.0, PS is leaky and sloppy, invisible fan shroud
'79 Bronco XLT 351m, C6, Edelbrock Performer 400 intake, Holley 6140, Howards cam, 4" suspension lift, 33x12.5x15 Duratracs, dana44 front and Ford 9" rear both 4.11 LSD, Warn hub locks, invisible fan shroud
'80 Suzuki GS750E 16V DOHC, looks about 6 months old
'13 Honda CR-V AWD

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Mike_B_SVT
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Re: Holley 4150 Rebuild (D0ZF-9510-AB / LIST 4514-1)

#3

Post by Mike_B_SVT » 12 Mar 2013, 17:38

Update: I am working on this, but have been pretty busy lately.
Mike B.
CCOA # 9553

1970 Cougar Eliminator (Competition Gold / Black Decor Interior)
1 of 70 with 428SCJ, Ram Air, 4-speed.
Cat Bites Man!

Looking for an Eliminator? Then be sure to check out the "Eliminators on the Market" thread in the Classic Cougars For Sale section of the forum!

User avatar
Mike_B_SVT
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Posts: 2975
Joined: 27 Oct 2011, 00:36
Location: Hillsboro, OR

Holley 4150 Rebuild (D0ZF-9510-AB / LIST 4514-1)

#4

Post by Mike_B_SVT » 05 Apr 2013, 15:43

Carburetor Disassembly

Carburetor disassembly is not rocket surgery. Basically, you have seven main components, each with several smaller components attached. Your rebuild kit should come with an exploded view diagram that numbers each part of the carburetor. It is common practice to remove / disassemble the components in numerical order (and reassemble in reverse-numerical order).

Image
Holley 4150 Exploded View #1

Holley 4150-4160 Exploded View.pdf

1) Remove the dashpot mounting bracket located at the front driver’s side of the carburetor (see Figure 1, below). This bracket is keyed for easy reinstallation in the proper position.

Image
Figure 1 - Dashpot Mounting Bracket

2) Remove the choke actuator assembly, located at the front passenger side of the carburetor.
----a. Remove the 3 screws that attach the choke actuator assembly to the carburetor main body (see Figure 2, below).

Image
Figure 2 - Choke Assembly

----b. As you remove the actuator assembly note that the Choke Fast Idle Cam has a lever that extends through a slot in the Choke Actuator Plate (see Figure 3, below). The Choke Return Spring holds the Choke Return Lever against the Fast Idle Cam Lever.

Image
Figure 3 - Choke Fast Idle Cam and Actuator Assembly

----c. Separate the Choke Plate Rod from the Choke Actuator Plate by removing the Choke Plate Rod Cotter Pin. You can now remove the Choke Actuator Plate from the carburetor.

Image
Figure 4 - Choke Actuator Plate and Choke Plate Rod

NOTE: I did not find it necessary to remove the choke plate (the flapper at the top) from the carburetor main body for my rebuild. If you need to remove the choke plate it should be straight-forward; the choke plate itself is held to the choke plate shaft with 2 screws. After removing the screws, the shaft should slide out of the main body allowing removal of the choke plate rod and choke rod seal (a small plastic piece that holds the rod in position).

3) Remove the Vacuum Secondary Assembly, located at the back passenger side of the carburetor (see Figure 2, above, for location).

Image
Figure 5 - Vacuum Secondary Assembly

----a. Remove the “C” clip holding the shaft of the Secondary Actuator to the Secondary Diaphragm Lever Assembly (see figure 5, above).
----b. Remove the three screws connecting the Secondary Actuator to the carburetor main body and slip the Secondary Actuator Rod off of the Secondary Diaphragm Lever Assembly (see figure 5, above).

4) Remove the primary fuel bowl and primary metering block (see figure 6, below);

NOTE: When removing the mounting screws be sure to support the fuel bowl and metering block so they do not fall.
CAUTION: Do not pry the components loose. If absolutely necessary use a plastic tool to minimize the possibility of damage to the seating surfaces.

Image
Figure 6 - Fuel Bowl and Metering Block Removal.jpg

----a. Remove the four screws holding the primary fuel bowl and primary metering block to the carburetor main body.
----b. After removing the screws you may find the fuel bowl and metering block are stuck to the main body or to each other due to adhesion of the gaskets. Gently but firmly remove the primary fuel bowl and metering block from the main body and then separate them from each other.

5) Remove the secondary fuel bowl and secondary metering block (see Figure 6, above);

NOTE: When removing the mounting screws be sure to support the fuel bowl and metering block so they do not fall.
CAUTION: Do not pry the components loose. If absolutely necessary use a plastic tool to minimize the possibility of damage to the seating surfaces.

----a. Remove the four screws holding the secondary fuel bowl and secondary metering block to the carburetor main body.
----b. After removing the screws you may find the fuel bowl and metering block are stuck to the main body or to each other due to adhesion of the gaskets. Gently but firmly remove the secondary fuel bowl and metering block from the main body and then separate them from each other.

6) Separate the throttle body from the main body of the carburetor (see Figure 7, below);

NOTE: When removing the attaching screws be sure to support the main body and throttle body so they do not fall.
CAUTION: Do not pry the components loose. If absolutely necessary use a plastic tool to minimize the possibility of damage to the seating surfaces.

Image
Figure 7 - Throttle Body

----a. Turn the carburetor over and remove the eight Phillips head screws from the bottom of the throttle body.
----b. After removing the screws you may find the main body and throttle body are stuck together due to adhesion of the gaskets. Gently but firmly separate the main body and throttle body from each other.

7) Your Carburetor is now broken down to its main components;
----a. Primary and Secondary Fuel Bowls
----b. Primary and Secondary Metering Body / Metering Blocks
----c. Secondary Diaphragm Assembly
----d. Main Body Assembly
----e. Throttle Body Assembly


Next we will disassemble and clean each of the main components.
Mike B.
CCOA # 9553

1970 Cougar Eliminator (Competition Gold / Black Decor Interior)
1 of 70 with 428SCJ, Ram Air, 4-speed.
Cat Bites Man!

Looking for an Eliminator? Then be sure to check out the "Eliminators on the Market" thread in the Classic Cougars For Sale section of the forum!

guitar74
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Posts: 1461
Joined: 11 Oct 2015, 16:55

Re: Holley 4150 Rebuild (D0ZF-9510-AB / LIST 4514-1)

#5

Post by guitar74 » 10 Dec 2015, 10:55

For spraying loose parts, I usually use brake cleaner as it does a great job, and is much easier on both your hands as well as other surfaces, and anything rubber. But honeslty, I take everything, including smaller parts, and use the good old bucket 'o' carb soak for 24 hrs. They come out squeaky clean, and all I have to do is dry them. I also with take a strand of wire and sort of crinkle it and run it through the jets after soaking, and then blow them out with compressed air. It's more of a precautionary/anal retentive thing to make sure there are no left over debris that can come loose and ruin the day when the carb is back together.

Also for gasket material, a dremel or drill with a super fine sctotch brite pad will make that job much faster. Did it in my motorcycle tech days and makes for a much less tedious job of getting material off of the carb.

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